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CHB Mail - 2021-10-14

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Steakholders reap reward

TUKI TALK

Gary Hamilton-Irvine You can buy Matangi Angus Beef products online at matangi.co. nz.

It’s only been on the market for two years but Matangi Angus Beef is fast becoming the envy of beef lovers and fine-dining restaurants across New Zealand. The mouth-watering premium beef is farmed in Hawke’s Bay across two farms in Matangi and, more recently, Elsthorpe. In 2019, the business released its first 28 animals to the market and has quickly grown in popularity. Matangi Angus Beef can now be found in top restaurants such as Craggy Range and Black Barn in Hawke’s Bay, Amano in Auckland and Blanket Bay in Queenstown. A former graphic designer and neuropsychologist manage the farm and business, married couple Jamie and Nicky Gaddum. The pair, along with the owners of the business, Robert and Inge Haselsteiner — who are based in Europe for much of the year — came up with the idea while enjoying a few barbecues and wines. “We talked about what we could do here at Matangi that was a little bit different from what other New Zealand producers are doing,” Nicky said. “We decided to try and produce the best beef that we can here in New Zealand and then supply it just for our local market.” Nicky said a lot of premium meat farmed in New Zealand was exported overseas but Matangi Angus Beef was solely farmed for the Kiwi market — and the feedback had been amazing. “To get the feedback from clients including a number of top chefs in New Zealand that this is the best [Angus beef] you can get is really rewarding.” She said farming sustainably and ethically was a big part of their business model. “Everything that we sell to our clients is bred on the farm . . . it has been born on the farm, and carried through here. “We also have an extensive environmental programme . . . planting between 1000 and 2000 natives every year and really trying to take care of the waterways and soil.” She said traditionally most beef in the supermarket was slaughtered at around 18 months of age but their cattle was slaughtered at 24 to 32 months. “That lets them grow bigger and put down more marbling. Because it is a slower process we are finding you tend to get a more tender and flavourful product.” She said they currently have about 450 cattle but did not want to become too large, capping the maximum number of cattle slaughtered during any given season at 150. She said she had enjoyed the switch in career from her work as a neuropsychologist late last year, while Jamie had been farming since about 2009 but previously worked as a graphic designer.

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